Airport Safety Week 2021: Day 4

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Refers to any clothing or equipment that is used by a worker in order to protect them from injury or illness. There are many types of PPE. Always wear the appropriate PPE for the hazards that you may encounter on the job or as required.

Eye protection 

Did you know that in Canada 700 Canadian workers sustain eye injuries every day on the job due to improper eye protection, resulting in lost time. It is estimated that 90% of these injuries could be prevented with proper eye wear. Activities requiring the appropriate level of eye protection include welding, cutting, brazing, sawing, grinding, spray painting, dusty environments, chemical gases, vapours, or liquids, sunlight or harmful light. Be sure to consult your supervisor or manager for job-specific eye protection requirements.

Hearing protection and loss prevention

You don’t know what you’ve lost until it’s gone! Sound levels of a jet engine range from 120dB – 140 dB. To get the full benefit of hearing protection, wear them wherever noise hazards are present. At the airport, there are certain areas that may require hearing protection. Examples include (but not limited to): airside, mechanical and generator rooms. Wearing your hearing protection in these areas will reduce the amount of noise reaching your ears and the risk of hearing loss.

Head protection

In construction zones, hard hats are worn because of the potential for head injury. Situations that could cause head injury on-the-job include working below other workers or machinery, around or under conveyor belts, around exposed energized conductors, and where there may be overhead obstructions.

Hand & finger protection

Gloves protect hands and forearms from cuts, abrasions, burns, puncture wounds, contact with hazardous chemicals, some electric shocks and blood borne pathogen diseases. If the job task requires wearing gloves, wear the right gloves for the right job!

Foot protection

Safety-toed footwear is worn to prevent crushed toes when working around heavy equipment or potential falling objects. Safety footwear must be CSA certified (green patch). Safety boots also provide protection from stepping on sharp objects and some di-electric protection. Inclement weather can create slipping hazards, so be safety conscious in footwear. Wear slip-resistant safety shoes or boots to prevent slipping.

Visibility: Stand out from all the rest, wear your safety vest!

Safety vest

All airport staff are required to wear a high visibility, reflective safety vest when in certain areas of the airport such as on the apron and Baggage Road locations, among others. Speak with your supervisor if you are unsure where safety vests are required.

Working airside? What you need to know about aircraft pushbacks

For employees working airside, it’s important to note that ground operations involve various aspects of aircraft handling, including aircraft movement on the apron areas. One of the safety challenges for the aircraft moving on the apron is vehicular traffic near aircraft stands and at the entry points to and from the manoeuvering area. To prevent aircraft cut offs and collisions when operating a vehicle airside, always remember the nine indications of an Aircraft Pushback:

9 Indications of an Aircraft Pushback
1. Pushback vehicle connected
2. Chocks removed
3. Bridge retracted
4. Equipment removed
5. Doors and hatches closed
6. Anti-collision beacon on
7. Engines may be running
8. Wing walkers in position
9. Marshaller in position

When drivers see any push back indicators, they must comply with the following directives that govern vehicular movement in the vicinity of departing aircraft:

  • Yield right-of-way to the marshalling crew when the crew is marshalling the aircraft and when they are returning to the gate after the aircraft is released.
  • Neither drive between a marshaller or wingwalker(s) and the aircraft nor proceed around, in front of, or behind the aircraft unless authorized by the marshaller or wingwalker(s).
  • Prior to pushback, proceed behind the aircraft only when the marshaller or wingwalker(s) signals permission to continue. 
  • Do not deviate from vehicle corridors to drive around an aircraft on pushback. Remain within the corridor until the ground crew and tug have cleared the apron side of the corridor.

Airside Vehicle Operator Permit Program (AVOP)

AVOP

As part of the re-imagining AVOP initiative, there are a few new and exciting announcements just around the corner! 

Since September 2020, AVOP written exam sessions have been extended from four weekly sessions to six weekly, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 08:30, 10:30 and 13:30 excluding statutory holidays.

The written exam location has been temporarily moved to Lounge 15 in Terminal 1 as of June 1, 2021. Lounge 15 is located at the far east end of Terminal 1, Departures level.

Security reminders: Lock then Walk, RAIC expiry, escort requirements

Lock then walk

Lock then Walk

Do your part in promoting a culture of security vigilance and reporting!

  • Unauthorized movement of passengers and employees between security areas has become a concern to government inspection agencies and the GTAA.  These incidents could impact and inconvenience our airlines and passengers by causing flight delays.
  • Swipe your RAIC every time it is required (if unsure call into SOC). Always monitor the door and wait for it to lock behind you to prevent unauthorized entry of passengers or other employees.

RAIC Expiry: Always check your RAIC!

I will display the RAIC on my outer clothing - on my chest or arm so that is is clearly visible at all times while in the performance of duties in a Restricted Area

When to renew

  • Pass Office will notify the signing authority six months in advance for TSC renewal.
  • Existing RAIC holders applying to renew their Transportation Security Clearance.
  • Returning RAIC holders who have not worked at Toronto Pearson for more than 12 months. 
  • Existing RAIC holders transferring from another Canadian airport to Toronto Pearson requiring a Toronto Pearson RAIC. 
I will submit to security screening when required to do so by GTAA personnel, police or CATSA representatives

Escort requirements

Escort Temporary pass holders must be escorted by a person in possession of a valid RAIC when entering an airport restricted area.  Escort ratios for temporary pass holders are as follows:

  • An escort must remain with the person under escort while the person is in the restricted area.
  • A single escort may accompany up to 10 temporary pass holders while moving throughout the restricted area.
  • A single surveillance may accompany up to 20 temporary pass holders if they are confined to one area (e.g. a classroom or playpen).

Health & Safety: Manual Handling Program

Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) are injuries and disorders of the muscles, tendons, nerves and spinal discs, and so on. They can develop for many reasons, including ongoing exposure to repetitive work, forceful exertions (such as heaving lifting, pushing and pulling), and awkward postures that can affect the bones, joints, ligaments and other soft tissues. Musculoskeletal injuries account for more than 30% of the total workplace injuries in GTAA. In 2021 alone, we have 13 reported cases of musculoskeletal injuries with varying severity, and eight of the 13 cases involves lifting, pulling and pushing activities.

Preventing musculoskeletal injury: A key part of our workplace health and safety program

  • Everyone should identify and assess job-related musculoskeletal hazards.
  • Put controls to minimize exposure to these hazards.
  • Learn and practice the four (4) key principles of our Manual Handling Program for preventing musculoskeletal injuries.

1. Inside Base

By keeping the load we are required to lift inside our base (or between our legs), we lift with our legs and not with our back.

There is no superhero secret to lifting, always keep inside base

2. Big Engines

Your thigh muscles are the largest muscles in your body. They are much stronger than your back muscles. Let your “big engines” do all of the work.

There is no superhero secret to lifting, use your big engines

3. Turn not Twist

Twisting is one of the worst things you can do when manual handling a load. The proper way to move your body is by moving your feet. This keeps the load in position and keeps the pressure off your spine.

There is no superhero secret to lifting, always turn not twist

4. Dip N’ Drive (to push or pull)

The key here is that your foot must face the direction of what you must pull or push. The dip and drive refers to the action of unlocking your knees and starting the push or pull, using two hands, and dip and drive to move the load. Once you start to gain momentum, the pushing or pulling action becomes less difficult.

There is no superhero secret to lifting, always dip and drive

Focus on the task, be aware of your surroundings, look at the direction of travel and avoid distractions. Report any known hazards to your supervisor or manager.

Eye on Safety Awards Nominee Spotlight – Tim

Meet Tim from GTAA

Tim, GTAA

Tim from the GTAA was nominated for a Health and Safety Leader award in the Safest Action category for his innovative solution to an ongoing safety issue. Tim understood that a traditional stop sign in a particular area may be difficult to see in inclement weather or nighttime, increasing the chance for a motor vehicle accident. Tim did some research, purchased and installed a larger stop sign that has flashing LED lights and is also solar powered.  Since this sign was installed there have been ZERO incidents!  Tim has since also placed one of these signs at another high-traffic location. Thank you, Tim! 

Do you know someone who should be nominated for an Eye on Safety Award? Nominate them today!

Today’s activities

Complete today’s quiz for your chance to win great prizes. Read the full contest rules. Please note: Today’s quiz is only open for completion from 8:00 am - 11:59 pm. A new quiz is posted daily. 

Want a chance to win more prizes? Take part in our Airport Safety Week activities.

 

Health & Safety: Manual Handling Program
Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) are injuries and disorders of the muscles, tendons, nerves and spinal discs, and so on. They can develop for many reasons, including ongoing exposure to repetitive work, forceful exertions (such as heaving lifting, pushing and pulling), and awkward postures that can affect the bones, joints, ligaments and other soft tissues. Musculoskeletal injuries account for more than 30% of the total workplace injuries in GTAA. In 2021 alone, we have 13 reported cases of musculoskeletal injuries with varying severity, and eight of the 13 cases involves lifting, pulling and pushing activities.
 

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