Airport Safety Week 2021: Day 3

 Each of us is an important member of the airport team. Although everyone’s job descriptions are different, everyone is equally responsible for ensuring the safety and security of our airport and passengers. Read below for some of the ways to do this.

Watch this video from Craig Bradbrook, the GTAA's Chief Operating Officer, discussing the importance of a safe return to work and key changes within our airside environment.

Airside Safety: Overall points to remember

  • Be aware, be present, be safe.
  • Always think safety first.
  • Operational efficiency NEVER trumps safety! Avoid speeding or driving under jet bridges – it will NOT get the job done faster.  
  • Observe posted signage, markings and flaggers. Taking unnecessary shortcuts can lead to serious injury and result in damage and delays for everyone.
  • Anticipate hidden dangers by keeping your eyes on the road at all times, exercising caution and slowing down.

Airside construction awareness: Surface closures & opening 

Every year, maintenance repair work is performed on our infrastructure at Toronto Pearson.  If you drive airside, be alert to signs of construction. Look closely at indicators for surface closings and surface returns or openings. 

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Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) or drones

Drones, or Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) are proving themselves to be incredibly useful at Toronto Pearson in a number of activities. It’s extremely important, however, that these flights are carefully planned, conducted and monitored by experienced pilots with adequate training and experience. The GTAA, in collaboration with NavCanada, is developing an approval process to ensure these flights can happen safely on airport lands and properties that complies with all local and national regulations and safety requirements. 

Successful flights so far have included an aircraft pressurization test,  inspection of the Automated People Mover (Terminal Link) tracks, tree surveys on the approach to Pearson’s Runway 05, and a test of avian radar and automated camera systems. More exciting projects are being planned all the time, including using drones to assist electricians inspect runway lights, help maintenance staff detect FOD, and more. 

It’s important that anyone considering incorporating RPAS technology into their work at Pearson contact the approval team at rpas@gtaa.com to learn more about the necessary requirements and clearances.

Infrared drone camera

Infrared drone camera used to detect pressurization leaks in aircraft

Drone inspecting the APM guideway

Drone inspection of the APM guideway

Drone doing a tree survey on 05 approach

Tree survey on 05 approach

Lightning Advisories at Toronto Pearson 

Toronto Pearson is equipped with an Airport Lightning Warning System (LWS) which provides alerts to the operational community when lightning strikes approach the airfield. When lightning is detected within an eight-kilometre alert zone, Airport Operations Control sends a notification to the airport operational community noting the presence of convective weather and to be alert to the likely activation of the strobe system. When the system goes into alert mode, strobes located on the terminal buildings and the rooflines of associated airport buildings visible from the apron will flash. 

In an active thunderstorm, the strobes are then active for 10 minutes in between strikes. Once there has not been a strike within 10 minutes, the strobes then turn off indicating there is no active storm within eight kilometres. Operations are then back to normal. Note: When the strobes activate, all airfield staff must follow their company procedures for lighting activity and established Occupational Health and Safety protocols.

Airside Security: Non-Passenger Screening of Vehicles

With Non-Passenger Screening of Vehicles (NPS-V), all vehicle operators accessing the Critical Area are required to have their RAIC or temporary pass, AVOP checked, and the RAICs or temporary passes of all vehicle occupants verified by an access control guard which is the GTAA’s responsibility.

RAIC holder escorts

If you are a RAIC holder escorting a temporary pass holder, you are required to present the temporary pass holders for screening when entering the Critical Area (even if the green arow is shown).

You must submit to the screening process of your person, personal items in your possession, and the vehicle you are travelling in if you are selected for screening.
Bypassing the Critical Area access control or NPS-V points, refusal to provide a RAIC for verification, or a refusal to be screened is not permitted. 

If you are lost, unsure of where to go, or need guidance on how to find a specific location, do not hesitate to call 416-776-3055 for assistance.

What to do when approaching NPS-V area

Any vehicles attempting to access the Critical Area are required to undertake additional screening. The screening is conducted by the Canadian Aviation Transportation Security Agency (CATSA).

Step 1: Drivers will first approach the verification booth and come to a full stop at the stop sign.

Step 2: Drivers and all occupants of the vehicle are to present their RAICs for verification by security staff.

Step 3: Drivers will then approach signage that consists of a stop sign with an electronic display below that will show either a green arrow or a red X. When the red X is visible, drivers are to pull off into the CATSA inspection area for screening and fully cooperate with CATSA staff. When the green arrow is visible, no screening is required and drivers are free to proceed on their way. Note: Even if the green arrow is illuminated, drivers MUST stop for RAIC verification before proceeding. 

Eye on Safety Award Nominee Spotlight – Justin

Meet Justin from Menzies Aviation

Justin

Justin from Menzies Aviation was nominated for a Health and Safety Leader award in the Safest Action category. While working airside, Justin noticed that an aircraft did not stop at the designated stop line and, instead,  kept taxiing towards the terminal past the stop line. Justin quickly activated the emergency stop button which, in turn, advised the Pilot-in-Command  to stop the aircraft.  If Justin hadn't activated the e-stop, the aircraft would have contacted the bridge, causing damage to both the aircraft and the bridge. Justin’s actions and quick thinking ensured both the aircraft and all passengers on board remained safe.

Thank you, Justin!

Do you know someone who should be nominated for an Eye on Safety Award? Nominate them today

Today’s activities

Complete today’s quiz for your chance to win great prizes. Read the full contest rules. Please note: Today’s quiz is only open for completion from 8:00 am - 11:59 pm. A new quiz is posted daily. 

Want a chance to win more prizes? Take part in our Airport Safety Week activities.

Lightning Advisories at Toronto Pearson 

Toronto Pearson is equipped with an Airport Lightning Warning System (LWS) which provides alerts to the operational community when lightning strikes approach the airfield. When lightning is detected within an eight-kilometre alert zone, Airport Operations Control sends a notification to the airport operational community noting the presence of convective weather and to be alert to the likely activation of the strobe system. When the system goes into alert mode, strobes located on the terminal buildings and the rooflines of associated airport buildings visible from the apron will flash. 
In an active thunderstorm, the strobes are then active for 10 minutes in between strikes. Once there has not been a strike within 10 minutes, the strobes then turn off indicating there is no active storm within eight kilometres. Operations are then back to normal. Note: When the strobes activate, all airfield staff must follow their company procedures for lighting activity and established Occupational Health and Safety protocols. 
 
Airside Security: Non-Passenger Screening of Vehicles
With Non-Passenger Screening of Vehicles (NPS-V), all vehicle operators accessing the Critical Area are required to have their RAIC or temporary pass, AVOP checked, and the RAICs or temporary passes of all vehicle occupants verified by an access control guard which is the GTAA’s responsibility.
RAIC holder escorts
If you are a RAIC holder escorting a temporary pass holder, you are required to present the temporary pass holders for screening when entering the Critical Area (even if the green arow is shown).
 

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