• Changing Exhibits

    What better place than Toronto Pearson – where people of all cultures and backgrounds come together – to showcase exhibits of art, design, history, science, popular culture and national history. Our ever-changing exhibits feature works by cultural institutions, organizations, collectors, art groups and even the GTAA.

    Explore our Current Exhibits

     

    Ice Huts by Richard Johnson 

    While ice fishing huts are utilitarian by nature—their purpose to provide respite from treacherous conditions during winter fishing expeditions—they vary widely in formal quality, material and stylistic flair. Builders, reveling in DIY spirit, create unique, idiosyncratic struc- tures that reflect their distinct personalities and interests—all in thirty square feet or less. For more than a decade, Toronto-based photographer Richard Johnson has documented this vernacular architectural tradition in Canada, in a typological study comprising more than one thousand photographs. In tightly cropped compositions devoid of human presence, Johnson fixes his lens on formal and material qualities of the architecture, and examines its relationship to site, revealing the creativity and humour with which builders approach hut design.

     

    Location: Terminal 3, Connector Tunnel.


    Richard Johnson Exhibit

     

     

    Kazuo Nakamura Sculptures 

    Galaxies circa 1963-1964
    Stainless Steel
    3.05 x 3.05 x 3.05 meters
    Part of the Transport Canada Collection

    Galaxies circa 1963-1964
    Stainless Steel
    3.05 x 3.05 x 3.05 meters
    Part of the Transport Canada Collection

    Kazuo Nakamura was a member of “Painters Eleven” from 1953-1960, an influential group of Toronto-based artists dedicated to abstraction. His geometric paintings and sculptures are highly regarded as among the most distinctive abstract works in twentieth century Canadian art.

    During World War II, Nakamura and his family were incarcerated at the Tashe internment camp from 1942-1944. They relocated to Hamilton, Ontario after their release. Soon after, Mr. Nakamura moved to Toronto to study art at the Central Technical School. From the early 1950s and throughout his distinguished half-century career, he exhibited widely throughout Canada, and created a large and multifaceted body of work. Nakamura described himself as seeking a "fundamental universal pattern in all art and nature". This pair of sculptures was designed specifically for the Toronto International Airport.

     

    Location: Terminal 1, U.S. Departures, near Gates F84 and F85